Wednesday 9 May 2012
Changes to Minimum Energy Performance Standards
Short Description The Australian Government has established minimum energy efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for many electrical appliances and equipment. MEPS specifies minimum efficiency levels that are enforced by Regulation. The scheme has been in operation for about ten years and, in some cases, new and higher efficiency levels are being imposed. This presentation will discuss the case of MEPS for distribution transformers in particular with also some discussion of large electric motors.
Venue Engineers Australia 122 Parry Street, Newcastle West,
Date Wednesday 9th May 2012
Members Cost Free
Non Members Cost $10.00
Event Contact Jo Papanicolaou
Contact Phone 4926 4440
Contact Email jpapanicolaou@engineersaustralia.org.au
Hosted By Electrical and Mechanical Branches and the Society for Sustainability and Environmental Engineering
Downloads changes_in_meps_9th_may_2012.pdf(105KB)

The Australian Government has established minimum energy efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for many electrical appliances and equipment. MEPS specifies minimum efficiency levels that are enforced by Regulation. The scheme has been in operation for about ten years and, in some cases, new and higher efficiency levels are being imposed. This presentation will discuss the case of MEPS for distribution transformers in particular with also some discussion of large electric motors.

The presentation will include discussion of the following topic areas:

  • The method of determination of the mandated efficiency levels and their relationship to other international energy efficiency schemes
  • The methods for determination of energy efficiencies and their accuracy and specified uncertainties for transformers and motors
  • The potential impact on manufacturers of the higher efficiency levels and the availability of low loss core steels
  • The impact of harmonic pollution of voltage and current by non-linear loads on the efficiency levels of transformers and motors and how they might impact on MEPS.

Presenter: Trevor Blackburn is with the School of Electrical Engineering, UNSW and has a very long association with power system equipment operation, monitoring and testing. He operated a NATA registered measurements laboratory at UNSW for 14 years and is also involved in insulation and diagnostic studies in the HV laboratory at UNSW.

He spent some time working on the development of MEPS efficiency levels for transformers. He currently has a research program investigating the impact of harmonics on transformer efficiency.

 
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