Wednesday 15 February 2012
Terror, Security and Money: The Evidence of the Value of Counter-Terrorism Expenditure
Short Description The presentation will review key findings of a new book Terror, Security, and Money: Balancing the Risks, Benefits, and Costs of Homeland Security (Oxford University Press, October 2011) that uses risk-based decision theory to determine acceptability of risk which is crucial to prioritise security and protective measures against terrorist events.
Venue Engineers Australia Auditorium 122 Parry Street, Newcastle West,
Date Wednesday, 15th February 2012
Members Cost Free
Non Members Cost Free
Event Contact Jo Papanicolaou
Contact Phone 02 49264440
Contact Email jpapanicolaou@engineersaustralia.org.au
Hosted By Civil / Structural Branch
Downloads mark_stewart_flyer_15th_feb_20121.pdf(74KB)

Professor Mark Stewart will assess terrorist threats to buildings and aviation infrastructure and the cost-effectiveness of protective and counter-terrorism measures. The presentation will describe a cost-benefit analysis that considers threat likelihood, cost of security measures, risk reduction and expected losses to compare the costs and benefits of security measures to decide which security measures are cost-effective, and those which are not.

Presenter: Professor Mark G Stewart

Professor Mark G. Stewart is Director of  the Centre for Infrastructure Performance and Reliability at The University of Newcastle, Australia. He is co-author of several books  and has  written more  than 300  technical papers and  reports. He  has more than  25 years of  experience in  probabilistic risk  and vulnerability assessment  of infrastructure and security systems that are subject to man-made and natural hazards.

Since  2004,  Mark  has  received  extensive  Australian  Research  Council  (ARC) support to develop probabilistic risk-modelling techniques for infrastructure subject to  military  and   terrorist  explosive blasts and cost-benefit assessments of counter- terrorism  protective measures  for critical  infrastructure.  In  2011, he  received  a five-year  Australian  Professorial  Fellowship  from  the  ARC  to  continue  and to extend that work.

The presentation will review key findings of a new book Terror, Security, and Money:  Balancing the Risks, Benefits, and Costs of Homeland Security(Oxford University Press, October  2011). The book uses risk-based decision theory to determine acceptability of risk which is crucial to prioritise security and protective measures against terrorist events. The cumulative increase in expenditures on US domestic homeland security over the decade since 9/11 exceeds one trillion dollars. How much of this expenditure is necessary? and how much has been effective?

The presentation will assess terrorist threats to buildings and aviation infrastructure and the cost-effectiveness of protective and counter-terrorism measures.The presentation will describe a cost-benefit analysis that considers threat likelihood, cost of security measures, risk reduction and expected losses to compare the costs and benefits of security measures to decide which security measures are cost-effective, and those which are not.We find that the protection of standard office-type buildings or bridges would be cost-effective only if the likelihood of a sizable terrorist attack on the building is a thousand times greater than it is at present. On the other hand, hardening cockpit doors on airliners is cost-effective, though the provision for air marshals is not.                          

Wednesday 15th February 2012

            Venue:     Engineers Australia Auditorium

                             122 Parry Street, Newcastle West

            Time:       5.30pm for 6.00pm start

            Cost:        This is a free event

            RSVP:     CLICK HERE or visit Events at www.engineersaustralia.org.au/newcastle to

Register by Monday 13th February 2012.

 

Enquires please contact 4926 4440 or jpapanicolaou@engineersaustralia.org.au

Continuing Professional Development CPD may be claimed for this presentation (1 point)

 
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