Special Interest Groups and Centre Awards

Engineering awards granted by the Special Interest Groups and Centre of Engineers Australia.

For general enquiries on these awards please contact Award Coordinator on engpracawards@engineersaustralia.org.au or 02 6270 6126.

Awards for work displaying engineering excellence (Category F)

  • John Monash Medal - Engineering Heritage Australia
  • Colin Crisp Award - Engineering Heritage Australia

John Monash Medal - Engineering Heritage Australia

The John Monash Medal is awarded by Engineering Heritage Australia (EHA) to a person who has made an outstanding contribution to the cause of engineering heritage over a considerable time.

The award is an inscribed medal with an accompanying certificate signed by the National President of Engineers Australia. It is presented annually except when, in the opinion of the EHA Board, there is no worthy nomination.

This Medal was approved by Council in l976 and perpetuates the memory of Sir John Monash who is recognised as Australia’s greatest military commander, and who was an engineer of exceptional and diversified talents.

In l921 Sir John Monash was appointed Chairman of the State Electricity Commission of Victoria and was responsible for the La Trobe Valley power scheme. He was awarded the Peter Nicol Russell Memorial Medal in l929.

The John Monash Medal was originally awarded for the best paper on engineering related to general engineering interests, and was first made in l979. In 2002, the John Monash Medal was re-designated as an award for engineering heritage.

More about this award

The medal was approved by the Board (then Council) in 1976 and perpetuates the memory of Sir John Monash is recognised as Australia's greatest military commander, and who was an engineer of exceptional and diversified talents. In 1921 Sir John Monash was appointed Chairman of the State Electricity Commission of Victoria and was responsible for the Latrobe Valley power scheme. He was awarded the Peter Nicol Russell Memorial Medal in 1929.

The annual award recognises outstanding contributions made by individuals towards increasing the awareness and conservation of Australia's engineering heritage.

Criteria

The winner is the nominee deemed by the EHA Board to have, over a considerable time, made an outstanding contribution to engineering heritage in Australia, through one or more of the following:

  • raising awareness of engineering heritage within the profession
  • promoting engineering heritage within the community
  • recording and documenting engineering heritage
  • conserving engineering heritage
  • other contributions to engineering heritage EHA considers worthy of recognition.

Nominations

  • Nominations should be brief, but present a persuasive case and contain sufficient information for comparative assessment of nominees.
  • Nominations may be made by any unit or member of Engineers Australia
  • Nominations shall be sent initially to the EHA Administrator by a closing date to be established.
  • Nominations shall be treated as confidential to the EHA Board.

Assessment

Engineering Heritage Australia will appoint a Committee to assess all nominations and to recommend a recipient to the EHA Board for approval.

The Committee includes:

  • A member of EHA who will act as convenor.
  • An eminent practitioner in engineering heritage.
  • An eminent heritage administrator, historian or distinguished member of the heritage community.
  • A Past President of Engineers Australia.

The award will be presented by the National President of Engineers Australia or a nominee, at a suitable and prestigious function.

Presentation of Award

The award will consist of a framed certificate, citation and medal and presented at a suitable event.

2016 Winner

Keith Baker FIEAust CPEng

Keith has been a member of Engineering Heritage Canberra since the early 1990’s and was Chair of the group for three years. He has also been a member of the National Committee of Engineering Heritage Australia since 1999. Whilst on the National Committee, he served in a variety of executive and functional positions, including two periods as Chairman: Keith chaired the National Engineering Heritage Conference held in Canberra in 2001 and led the review of conference papers in 2013. In addition, through personal representation, articles and papers in various EA magazines and conferences, he has actively sought to ensure that the broader EA membership is aware of heritage issues and the achievements of EHA.

Keith is a member of Australia ICOMOS and the National Trust of Australia (ACT). He was also a member of the ACT (Government) Heritage Council's Standing Committee on Built Heritage for two years.

His book A Centenary of Canberra Engineering has promoted Engineering Heritage within the ACT and beyond. It was written to appeal to the general public rather than just engineers or historians, thus broadening its interest to the wider community. It was released in May 2013 to coincide with the Centenary of Canberra, weaving together the engineering and social aspects of the growth of the Capital. The book won a National Trust(ACT) Award and EA’s Colin Crisp Award.

While working in Melbourne and Canberra with Commonwealth and Territory Government organisations concerned with works, construction and housing, he developed a strong interest and skills in the engineering and management of heritage structures. He subsequently undertook a Master of Applied Science in Cultural Heritage Management at the University of Canberra, and worked for a time for the Australian Heritage Commission. He formed his own consultancy company and undertook heritage studies on range of subjects, mainly in Canberra, covering street lighting, the Cotter Dam and Pumping Station, an interpretation of the Kingston Powerhouse, the Main Outfall Sewer and the engineering services in Old Parliament House and the Fitters Workshop.

The award of the John Monash Medal recognises Keith’s long term work to document, conserve and promote Australia’s engineering and industrial heritage.

Colin Crisp Award - Engineering Heritage Australia

Colin Crisp Award perpetuates the memory of Colin Crisp, who was a structural engineer well known for his work in the conservation of heritage structures. This project award is given for excellence in the conservation and recording of items of heritage significance; in recording engineering accomplishment and the development of technology; or in education and raising awareness in engineering heritage.

Judging Criteria

The criteria to which the judging panel will refer in assessing entries may include, but are not limited to:

For Conservation Projects
1. Excellence in engineering heritage, including adherence to the principles of the Burra Charter or other relevant accepted heritage practices
2. Pertinence of the solution
3. Benefit to the community
4. Originality, innovation and ingenuity of the solution
5. Use of sound engineering practice and principles

For Documentation Projects
1. Excellence in engineering heritage, including adherence to the principles of the Burra Charter or other relevant accepted heritage practices
2. Pertinence of the solution
3. Benefit to the community
4. Originality, innovation and ingenuity of the solution

Terms and Conditions

Entries should not exceed 6,000 words or 12 pages in 12 point (Arial or Times New Roman) excluding attachments.
There is no limitations on the size of attachments.
The project must have been completed within a reasonable time prior to closing of entries for judging so that it still possesses a reasonable degree of currency
Entries shall be provided by attachment to the submission form. If the files are too large for this method of delivery, then they may be placed on the USB stick and sent to the Awards Coordinator.

2017 Winners

2017 winner of the Colin Crisp Award for Documentation Project: Roads and Maritime Services, Environment Branch and GHD Newcastle have been awarded a Colin Crisp Award for the Documentation: RMS Movable Bridge Study.

Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) currently manages 26 movable span bridges in NSW, of which 14 are still operational. Between 1802 and 2005 there were five distinct types of movable bridge types built which included pontoon, vertical lift, bascule, swing and sliding spans. In total 66 movable span bridges were constructed in NSW, of which the majority (48) were of the vertical lift or the bascule type, but many of these have now been demolished or are permanently closed.

RMS Movable Span Bridge Study documents the overarching history and individual past of the vertical lift span bridges, bascule bridges, and the sole remaining Roads and Maritime swing bridge in NSW, along with the only vertical lift table bridge in Australia. The study provides extensive research and background information utilising numerous documents and sources to establish each bridge’s history, integrity and enable their engineering heritage significance to be evaluated and assessed.

Through comparative analysis of the lifting mechanisms of all 66 bridges, the study built a classification system that identifies each bridge as belonging to one of 13 sub-types. This classification provides a better understanding of performance and shortcomings of those movable span bridges that are still operational as these issues are common to all bridges within a type. Another benefit of this classification is that it enables the standardization of replacement components across each type and the development of more consistent maintenance schedules.

The RMS Movable Span Bridge Study has been completed by GHD in conjunction with the Environment Branch of the Roads and Maritime Services. The study will play a vital role in assisting Roads and Maritime Services in managing their heritage movable span bridges into the future.

The Study closely follows the Burra Charter process in its sequence of investigations, decisions and actions recommended.

The combination of rare RMS archival photographs and stored bridge plans enables a better technical understanding of each bridge’s operation than has been previously achieved, forming a valuable reference within Australia and overseas. This is particularly important for the 22 bridges that have been replaced and are no longer available for inspection.

 

2017 winner of the Colin Crisp Award for Conservation Project: Sydney Trains and Ventia Utility Services - Macdonaldtown Gasworks Remediation: Restoration of the Heritage-Listed Southern Gasholder.

The Southern Gasholder is the only Victorian-era gasholder still standing in New South Wales. Ventia Utility Services Pty Ltd undertook its restoration for Sydney Trains. The conservation work was part of the Macdonaldtown Gasworks Remediation within the former Eveleigh Gasworks.

The Southern Gasholder, listed on the State Heritage Register as part of the Eveleigh Railway Workshops, was an integral element of the former Gasworks, which was built in 1892 to meet increased demand for gas lighting of railway carriages, stations and railway yards. The Southern Gasholder was operational until 1977.

The gasholder, measuring approximately 20 metres in diameter, has two nested internal steel lifts. It also has a steel superstructure that measures up to 13 metres in height. The superstructure supported and guided the two-stage lift of a steel bell, forming the containment tank that stored the manufactured gas.

Sydney Trains had originally intended the restoration of the gasholder to be carried out in-situ; however during early investigations, Ventia recognised that restoring the gasholder’s superstructure offsite would achieve a better long-term conservation outcome. Subsequent offsite restoration minimised the structural risks and allowed protective treatment of all metal-work and the reuse of most of the original fastenings. The remaining bell structure was restored onsite under controlled conditions before the superstructure was reinstated.

Significant challenges were faced because the remediation of the site required soil to be excavated to depths of up to 6 metres around the gasholder’s substructure. Ventia engaged geotechnical consultants Coffey Geotechnics, alongside structural and conservation consultant Bill Jordan & Associates, to develop an excavation sequence that would not have any adverse impacts on the below-ground brick annulus of the gasholder. The security of the gasholder’s substructure was also maintained during remediation excavations by dewatering its brick annulus and steel bell.

The replacement of the Southern Gasholder’s only missing components, its decorative finials, was achieved by casting them from the similar parts of the disassembled Molong Gasholder. The new finials were placed atop the gasholder’s columns in February 2017, enhancing the structure both technically and aesthetically, and completing its authentic restoration to a high standard.

 

Awards sponsored by and administered by divisions and groups (Category G)

Women in Engineering Gender Diversity Awards

  • Most Outstanding Company in Gender Diversity - Women in Engineering
  • Most Ambitious Company in Gender Diversity - Women in Engineering
  • Most Encouraging Student Group in Gender Diversity - Women in Engineering

Most Outstanding Company in Gender Diversity

About this Award

(Category G - Awards sponsored by and administered by divisions and groups and those that do not fit any other category)

This award promotes national engineering excellence and the contribution women in engineering make to the community. This award seeks to identify, recognise and reward companies that strive towards national engineering excellence in encouraging gender diversity.

Judging Criteria

The criteria to which the judging panel will refer in assessing entries may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Examples of groups formed or projects demonstrating recruiting, retaining and recognising female engineers
  2. Previous awards, including but not limited to Women Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) award attaining Employer of Choice Gender Equality (EOCGE), and/or significant effort in improvement of policies, procedures in regards to Gender Diversity
  3. Degree to which a company has fostered skills development of female engineers
  4. Degree to which female engineers have achieved career progression within the company
  5. Numbers of female engineers and female members of Engineers Australia per male equivalency (fellows, CPEng, members and grads)

Presentation of Award

The award consists of a framed certificate and is presented at a special event selected as appropriate by the Women in Engineering National Committee.

2017 Winners

Arup

Nomination made by Lisa Gardner, Regional Corporate Communication Manager

Highly Commended Prize went to GHD.

Most Ambitious Company in Gender Diversity

About this Award

(Category G - Awards sponsored by and administered by divisions and groups and those that do not fit any other category)

This award promotes national engineering excellence and the contribution women in engineering make to the community. This award seeks to identify, recognise and reward companies that strive towards national engineering excellence in encouraging gender diversity.

Judging Criteria

The criteria to which the judging panel will refer in assessing entries may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Examples of groups formed or projects demonstrating recruiting, retaining and recognising female engineers
  2. Significant effort in improvement of policies, procedures in regards to Gender Diversity
  3. Numbers of female engineers and female members of Engineers Australia per male equivalency (fellows, CPEng, members and grads)
  4. Degree to which a company has fostered skills development of female engineers
  5. Degree to which female engineers have achieved career progression within the company

Presentation of Award

The award consists of a framed certificate and is presented at a special event selected as appropriate by the Women in Engineering National Committee.

2017 Winners

Arc Infrastructure

Nomination made by Melanie Henley, Manager Corporate Affairs

Highly Commended Prize went to IT Power.

Most Encouraging Student or Non-Profit Group in Gender Diversity

About this Award

(Category G - Awards sponsored by and administered by divisions and groups and those that do not fit any other category)

This award promotes national engineering excellence and the contribution women in engineering make to the community. This award seeks to identify, recognise and reward companies that strive towards national engineering excellence in encouraging gender diversity.

Judging Criteria

The criteria to which the judging panel will refer in assessing entries may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Examples of groups formed or projects demonstrating attraction and encouragement of females to study engineering
  2. Audience number/Number of students targeted
  3. Number of current females studying engineering and/or studying engineering supporting the group
  4. Degree to which the group has fostered skills development of female engineers
  5. Degree to which female engineers have achieved career progression/managerial roles within the company

Presentation of Award

The award consists of a framed certificate and is presented at a special event selected as appropriate by the Women in Engineering National Committee.

2017 Winners

ANU Fifty50

Nomination made by Francesca McLean, Co-founder and Strategic Director

Highly Commended Prize went to Robogals Global.

SOCIAL FEED

  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 7 hours hence
ICYMI Engineers using #BigData system to support predictive maintenance https://t.co/d7IKtjYy0t https://t.co/AFVpfQBCMJ
  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 3 hours hence
Quick Chat with Young Professional Engineer of the Year Stephen Bornstein https://t.co/T3ngMZbpgK https://t.co/w1nNVi4YVt
  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 3 hours hence
RT @Data61news: Great question from Melissa Jovic - "Do you agree with @EngAustralia that it's time for industry and gov to adopt targets t…
  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 3 hours hence
RT @AdrianMacHunter: Proud to be inducted as a Fellow with @EngAustralia and continue my dedication to the pursuit of #engineering excellen…
  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 11 hours ago
@ereharrison We advocate for a national scheme but this isn’t feasible until the majority of state implement a regi… https://t.co/GPA5Him6Yp
  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 12 hours ago
RT @MahsaMirmomeni: Very productive gathering of academics and industry representatives at @EngAustralia today for the @MonashUni annual Ci…
  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 13 hours ago
Engineers & scientists make up an expert team that's preparing to retrieve remains of fallen WWII servicemen from u… https://t.co/PA1Ujyu9qC
  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 14 hours ago
"The Tasmanian region is small enough that it is possible to work with teams made up of the same good people from m… https://t.co/5p7wJ7C8Gx
  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 16 hours ago
How a networked system with sensors enables agricultural harvest machinery to automatically recognise its surroundi… https://t.co/YnwROZVWLZ
  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 18 hours ago
We want the Tasmanian Government to be an informed policymaker on engineering related matters as we launch the 201… https://t.co/ScVJiJhEdT
  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 18 hours ago
RT @couriermail: Looking for work? Here's where the #jobs are booming in #Queensland https://t.co/v9yNhiIcJk
  • Engineers Australia
  • @EngAustralia - 20 hours ago
Check out this helpful quiz that narrows down a career in the STEM field that suits you #DoWhatYouLove https://t.co/3KKeWY2CtO