For primary students

As a young, creative student you are one of Australia's future innovators.

When should a child learn about engineering? The answer may surprise you. While the concept of engineering brings to mind all manner of technical skills, scientific knowledge and high-level thinking the fact is that all engineers were once young students who found a passion for problem solving through creativity and ingenuity.

It is never too early to introduce a student to engineering. With a natural flair for creativity and a bold attitude towards learning, instilling a passion for the components of engineering at a young age is a fantastic way to guide a child toward a STEM career.

Engineers Australia has partnered with Australia’s Chief Scientist to develop the STARportal.edu.au,  Australia’s first centralised national portal for exciting and engaging STEM activities from around the country. This searchable database connects parents, students and teachers with their local and online STEM activities in real time.

The STARportal has been a collaboration between the Office of the Chief Scientist, Engineers Australia, Telstra, AMSI, BHP Billiton and the Commonwealth Bank, in consultation with the Department of Education to ensure all Australian families have access to any and all STEM outreach activities in their area and online.

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Supporting the nutrient requirements of crew members is critical for deep #space missions. #Engineers are working o… https://t.co/oSef1rALyA
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Last year, a 1912 Imperial EB tractor and unique example of historic Australian #engineering ingenuity was sold ove… https://t.co/yIIZjeAYz8
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When archer Taymon Kenton-Smith takes aim in the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games, he’ll hold the bow with a custom grip… https://t.co/hUIGqrj1kA
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Porcupines are born with thousands of sharp, needle-like quills. A group of engineers have discovered that through… https://t.co/Z1LWr9xPvi
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New technology that can convert human urine into fertiliser onsite could enable an expansion of urban farming and e… https://t.co/SRETtPI489
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The promise of #additivemanufacturing can run aground when it comes to applying the technique at scale. That’s why… https://t.co/4lE5U9LgwP
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Two days left to have your say on our updated climate change position draft. Follow the link to read the draft an… https://t.co/P2qPITvaOG
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#Environmentalengineer Sarah Board has worked through severe droughts, bushfires and damaging flood events. For… https://t.co/3u2ryZUbKJ
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Western Australia’s first locally designed and made satellite is setting the standard for the next generation of Au… https://t.co/FruYoThhGe
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An #aeronauticalengineer from Melbourne is part of a team searching for signs of life in the clouds of Venus.… https://t.co/bsiFa4tL5A
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#Electricalengineer and robotics specialist Professor Ian Manchester is preparing for a not-too-distant future wher… https://t.co/sFw8TeMAJf
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We are updating our position statement on climate change to reflect our continued commitment to addressing the prof… https://t.co/fMxxs0kMrI