Minimising vehicle to tram collisions

Trams have operated continuously in Melbourne since 1884 on a network which has progressively grown to become the world’s largest, with 521 trams in operation on 26 different routes covering 250km of dual track. At this event, guests will hear from our speakers as they explore the tram corridor design and configuration, and strategies to reduce the number of vehicle to tram collisions on Melbourne’s network. They will also discuss the benefits of these strategies in improving safety to passengers and the community, as well as the operational benefits to trams.
Melbourne tram

Overview

Trams have operated continuously in Melbourne since 1884 on a network which has progressively grown to become the world’s largest, with 521 trams in operation on 26 different routes covering 250km of dual track. 

As cities around the world continue to grow, light rail has become a popular and financially viable form of efficient mass public transport. This is particularly true in Australia, with the recent opening of tram lines in the Gold Coast, Newcastle, Sydney and Canberra and construction/planning in progress for new lines in Paramatta, Adelaide, Sunshine Coast & Hobart. 

New light rail lines benefit from being built to current design standards for capacity, accessibility and safety. In contrast, systems such as Melbourne’s which is over 130 years old, have evolved and must continually modernise their network and operations to adapt to a shared traffic (vehicle/tram) legacy environment in which the majority of the tram network (75%) still operates. With Melbourne’s population growing by approximately 2,000 people per week, traffic congestion is increasing annually. The number of vehicle/tram incidents occurring across the network isalso increasing, and can result in up to 10 trams being out of service at any time. 

In 2018, there were 1,100 vehicle/tram collisions, an increase from 970 in 2017. The majority of these were caused by motorists failing to look out for trams while turning right, performing a U-Turn or merging lanes. 97% of accidents were the fault of the motorists. Collisions between vehicles and trams can also result in serious injury to both vehicle / tram passengers from emergency braking and subsequent falls.

At this event, guests will hear from our speakers as they explore the tram corridor design and configuration, and strategies to reduce the number of vehicle to tram collisions on Melbourne’s network. They will also discuss the benefits of these strategies in improving safety to passengers and the community, as well as the operational benefits to trams. 

 

Speakers

Mike Ford - Mike is a Chartered Professional Engineer working at Jacobs as a Senior Track & Civil Design Engineer, a Technical Leader for Light Rail and the Client Service Leader for Yarra Trams. His core expertise is the Design Management and Engineering Design of light rail projects. Mike has recently performed key design and management roles on tram infrastructure upgrades projects including the delivery of new level access tram stops, depots, termini and track renewals and is the lead Technical Advisor for all tram diversion and legacy design works on the Melbourne Metro Rail Tunnel. Mike has had the satisfaction of assisting with the delivery of Yarra Trams’ Route 96 Premium Line Upgrade Project over the last 6 years as a Design Manager. Completed in January this year, the project provides Melbourne's first fully accessible tram route with level access tram stops and low floor trams. Having worked closely with Yarra Trams and DoT in the light rail industry for the past 13 years, Mike has an extensive knowledge of the unique issues associated with running the world’s largest tram network with the majority of it operating in a shared traffic environment with vehicles.

Anna Loughnan - Anna is a Track and Civil Engineer at Jacobs with design experience on a variety of key, multi-disciplinary light rail infrastructure projects. Most recently, Anna was a member of the design team delivering Melbourne's largest tram occupation to date on the Route 96 Premium Line Upgrade Project, where six new accessible tram stops were constructed and are now supporting equal, accessible and high frequency services along a key transport corridor. In addition, Anna is the lead designer working on a major upgrade at Brunswick Tram Depot in Melbourne, effectively doubling its current capacity. She is continuing to work closely with Yarra Trams and the Department of Transport in the optioneering process to reconfigure the Depot and support the overarching network cascade plan. Personally, Anna is passionate about providing accessible and reliable public transport to all members of the community, as well as encouraging the contribution of young and diverse people to the rail industry.

Date
08 / 07 / 2020 - 06:00 pm to 08:00 pm
(
AEST
)
Registration Closes
08 / 07 / 2020 06:00 pm
Venue
Level 31, 600 Bourke Street
Engineers Australia
Melbourne
,
Victoria
,
3000
Cost
Registration
  • Member Rate: $0.00 ($0.00 excl. GST)
  • Student Member Rate: $0.00 ($0.00 excl. GST)
  • Non-Member Rate: $30.00 ($27.27 excl. GST)
Host(s)
RTSA
Event Contact
Maximum CPD Hours
1.5