State registration

Laws around registration of engineers are different in each state.

In Australia, each state and territory is responsible for registration of engineers. Some jurisdictions don’t require an engineer to be registered to practise and others have statutory regulations that require it.

State registration of engineers is important because it ensures engineers meet benchmarked education, training, professional conduct and competency standards. These standards help consumers feel confident in the abilities of the engineers they engage. They also ensure there’s a legislative framework in place to protect against poor practice.

As Australia’s peak body for engineers, Engineers Australia advocates strongly for the registration of engineers throughout Australia. 

Current state and territory registration requirements

As the need for state registration gains momentum, individual jurisdictions are starting to implement legislation. We’ll keep this page updated with the changes as they happen. However, the onus is on engineering professionals to check with the relevant authorities to ensure they’ve covered off the necessary requirements.

The Professional Engineers Act 2023 passed the ACT Legislative Assembly on 23 March 2023.

The ACT Government is finalising the details for implementation of the scheme. Key elements include the appointment of a Professional Engineer Registrar, registration application processes, a code of practice and continuing professional development requirements. The scheme is due to become operational in March 2024.

Visit the ACT Government for more information.

In NSW not all engineers need to be registered. If you’re a professional engineer working on class 2 buildings or buildings with a class 2 part, class 3 or class 9c buildings, you may need to be registered. Fair Trading registers professional engineers and design practitioners under the Design and Building Practitioners Act 2020. Visit NSW Fair Trading to find out if you need to be registered.

If you meet NSW Fair Trading’s eligibility criteria, you may be able to register directly with them.

In some cases you may need to complete a competency assessment through Engineers Australia. Learn how Engineers Australia can help with assessment for NSW state registration.

In the Northern Territory the Building Practitioners Board registers engineers. Registration is only required for the building industry and certain areas of engineering. Visit the NT Building Practitioners Board for more information.

In Queensland, practising engineers must be registered to carry out professional engineering services. The exception to this is if you work under the direct supervision of a registered engineer or work only to a prescriptive standard.

Check the Board of Professional Engineers Queensland (BPEQ) website for information about how to register in Queensland.

Engineers Australia is an approved assessment entity for the BPEQ. If you’re a professional engineer with a Chartered or NER credential, you've already met the requirements for registration. Download your RPEQ assessment letter from the EA portal and use it to register with BPEQ.

If you don’t have a Chartered or NER credential, you can apply for an Engineers Australia assessment for Queensland state registration.

At this time South Australia doesn’t require engineers to be registered to practise. However, other registration requirements may be in place so check with the relevant authorities.

In Tasmania Consumer, Building and Occupational Services (CBOS) registers engineers. Registration is only required for the building industry and certain areas of engineering. Visit the CBOS website for more information.

In Victoria if you work in one of five prescribed areas of engineering you must be registered to provide professional engineering services. The exception to this is if you work under the direct supervision of a registered engineer or work only to a prescriptive standard.

See our Victorian state registration assessment guide for more information on how to apply for assessment of qualifications, skills and competencies.

If you’re a professional engineer with a Chartered or NER credential, you don’t need any further assessment. You can download your Victorian registration outcome report from the EA portal. Use this when you apply for registration with Consumer Affairs Victoria’s Business Licensing Authority.

If you don’t have a Chartered or NER credential, you can apply for an assessment for Victorian state registration.

If you work in the building industry, you’ll need to apply for an assessment of your building industry experience. Learn how to get assessed for a building industry endorsement.

Learn more about registration and endorsement by Consumer Affairs Victoria’s Business Licensing Authority.

From 1 July 2024, new laws will require building engineers to be registered by the Building Services Board to carry out, or contract with consumers to carry out, building engineering work in Western Australia.

Registration will be implemented in two stages:

  1. From 1 July 2024 – structural and fire safety building engineers
  2. From 1 July 2025 – civil and mechanical building engineers

A two-year transition period applies for each stage. Visit the WA Government for more information.

Visit the assessment for state registration page to learn what's required to apply in each state.

Mutual recognition

Professional engineers must register in each jurisdiction that requires registration if they plan to practise there. However under the Mutual Recognition Act 1992, if you’re registered as an engineer in one Australian jurisdiction you can be registered as an engineer in another. For example, if you’re already registered in Queensland you’d still need to apply for registration in Victoria, but mutual recognition means you may only need to complete the competency assessment for registration once to cover both jurisdictions.

If you believe you qualify for mutual recognition, contact the statutory registration body in the state you want to register.

If you have any questions about credentials or membership, please contact us

Publications

Minimum requirements nationally consistent registration cover
Engineers Australia | February 2023

Minimum requirements for registration for independent practice

Engineers Australia has developed a guide on the minimum registration requirements for national registration. This guide outlines our position and will support our advocacy towards national consistency.

Case for nationally consistent registration
Engineers Australia | February 2023

The case for nationally consistent registration

This guide outlines Engineers Australia's position on registration for professional engineers and will support our advocacy towards national consistency.